Sharks & Rays

Sharks and rays belong to an ancient group of fish whose skeletons are composed entirely of cartilage. There are several hundred species of sharks, ranging in size from six inches to over 50 feet; the very largest ones - whale sharks and basking sharks, are plankton-feeders. Only about a dozen or so species have actually been implicated in unprovoked attacks on human beings. These attacks are extremely rare, and can often be attributed to mistaken identity. Today, most of the larger species are declining in numbers, due to overfishing.

Mako Shark,
California
Hammerhead,
Galapagos
Blue Shark,
California
Sandtiger Shark,
North Carolina
Sandtiger Shark,
North Carolina
Sandtiger Shark,
North Carolina
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Lemon Shark,
Bahamas
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Lemon Sharks,
Bahamas
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Lemon Shark,
Bahamas
Tiger Shark,
Bahamas
Sandtiger Shark,
North Carolina
Sandtiger Shark,
North Carolina
Whale Shark,
Western Australia
Silvertip Shark,
New Guinea
Gray Reef Sharks,
Fiji
Gray Reef Shark,
Fiji
Silvertip Shark,
New Guinea
Manta,
Red Sea
Manta,
Hawaii
Manta Ray,
Indonesia
Manta Ray,
Indonesia
Manta Ray,
Indonesia
Cownose Rays,
Galapagos
Cownose Rays,
Galapagos
Hammerheads,
Galapagos
Caribbean Reef Shark,
Bahamas
Wobbegong,
New Guinea
Caribbean Reef Shark,
Bahamas
Blue Shark,
California
Silvertip Shark,
New Guinea
Blue Shark,
California
Stingray,
Red Sea
Eagle Ray,
Cayman
Eagle Ray,
New Zealand
Leopard Shark,
Maldives
Swell Shark,
Tasmania
Leopard Shark,
Maldives
Manta,
Hawaii
Eagle Ray,
Cayman
Marble Ray,
Costa Rica

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All images © David Hall. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of these images is strictly forbidden.