Fish Schools

A "shoal" is any group of fish engaged in similar behavior, while a "school" is a shoal that swims together in a coordinated manner. Many species of fish engage in schooling behavior for at least some part of their lives. Smaller fish often school for protection, since it is more difficult for a predator to pick out an individual target when faced with a coordinated, swirling mass. Similarly, larger fish may school for increased efficiency in finding or attacking prey. Other possible adaptive advantages of schooling include greater hydrodynamic efficiency for swimming, and greater ease in finding a mate.

Jacks,
New Guinea
Barracuda,
New Guinea
Maomao,
New Zealand
Barracuda,
New Guinea
Catfish,
New Guinea
Barracuda,
New Guinea
Swirling Jacks,
Cocos
Fusiliers,
Fiji
Bannerfish,
New Guinea
Raccoon butterflyfish,
Hawaii
Bigeyes,
Fiji
Fusiliers,
Seychelles
Bigeye Jacks,
Indonesia
Butterflyfish,
Seychelles
Barracuda,
Papua New Guinea
Soldierfish,
Dominica
Surgeonfish,
Fiji
Basslets,
Palau
Salema,
Galapagos
Mullet,
Seychelles
Trevallies,
Indonesia

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