Corals

   Corals, sea anemones and their relatives belong to a group of animals called Cnidarians. Coral colonies are composed of individual polyps that have six or more tentacles, each lined with stinging cells (nematocysts). There are several different kinds of corals and coral-like animals. Hard corals secrete limestone skeletons and are responsible for the creation of tropical coral reefs. Related animals - such as soft corals, gorgonians and sea pens - do not construct reefs, but are nevertheless important to reef ecology.
   Reef-building corals gain energy and nutrition from symbiotic algae that live within their tissues, and that may impart a distinctive color to their hosts. Most corals grow very slowly - often only inches a year - but over a period of thousands of years they can create enormous structures such as atolls and barrier reefs.

Coral Reef,
Fiji
Coral Reef,
Micronesia
Coral Reef,
Indonesia
Coral Reef and Jacks,
New Guinea
Coral Reef,
New Guinea
Coral Reef and Fusiliers,
Solomon Islands
Sea Fan,
Fiji
Hard Corals,
Fiji
Soft Corals,
Fiji
Table corals,
Indonesia
Sea Pens,
British Columbia
Cabbage Coral,
Fiji
Broccoli Coral,
Indonesia
Soft Coral,
Indonesia
Soft Coral,
Papua New Guinea
Sea Fan,
New Guinea
Sea Fan,
Indonesia
Sea Fan, Indonesia
Hard Coral,
Indonesia
Daisy Coral,
Indonesia
Gorgonian Coral,
Caribbean
Black Coral,
Indonesia
Tube Coral,
Red Sea
Wire Coral,
Indonesia
Soft Coral,
Indonesia
Hard Coral,
New Guinea
Whip Coral,
New Guinea
Hard Coral,
Palau
Spawning Coral,
New Guinea
Hard Coral,
Indonesia
Hard Coral,
Japan
Sea Fan,
New Guinea
Hard Coral,
New Guinea
Mushroom Coral,
Indonesia
Anchor Coral,
Indonesia
Sea Fan,
Indonesia
Corallimorpharians,
Tasmania
Star Coral,
Caribbean
Zoanthids,
Tasmania

Home

All images © David Hall. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of these images is strictly forbidden.